The images I share here come from my heart. They are not to be reproduced without my express written permission.

Bennett Place: a bit of history

On April 17, 1865, General Joseph Eggleston Johnston and Major General William Tecumseh Sherman began negotiations for terms of surrender for all Confederate troops still fighting in Florida, Georgia, and the Carolinas. The negotiations continued the following day and were finalized on April 26, 1865 when the treaty was signed at the home of James and Nancy Bennett.

 

Despite efforts to preserve the original Bennett House, a fire destroyed the house in 1921. The house which stands there today is an original house built in approximately 1840. It was owned by the Proctor family, who lived about 4 miles from the Bennett's home. In 1960, the Proctor house was moved and placed on the foundation of the Bennett house site, then modified and restored to resemble an almost-exact duplicate of the original Bennett Home.



The rock chimney is the only artifact remaining from the original house of James and Nancy Bennett.








Here is the text of the document signed by Johnston and Sherman, which resulted in 89,270 Confederate soldiers laying down their arms: the largest surrender of the Civil War, the bloodiest war ever fought on American soil:
Terms of a Military Convention, entered into this 26th day of April, 1865, at Bennitt's House, near Durham Station, North Carolina, between General Joseph E. Johnston, commanding the Confederate Army, and Major-General W.T. Sherman, commanding the United States Army in North Carolina:

  1. All acts of war on the part of the troops under General Johnston's command to cease from this date.
  2. All arms and public property to be deposited at Greensboro, and delivered to an ordinance-officer of the United States Army.
  3. Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate; one copy to be given to an officer to be designated by General Sherman. Each officer and man to give individual obligation in writing not to take up arms against the Government of the United States, until properly released from this obligation.
  4. The side-arms of officers, and their private horses and baggage, to be retained by them.
  5. This being done, all the officers and men will be permitted to return to their homes, not to be disturbed by the United States authorities, so long as they observe their obligation and the laws in force where they may reside.
W. T. Sherman, Major-General Commanding United States Forces in North Carolina
J. E. Johnston, General Commanding Confederate States Forces in North Carolina
Approved: U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General








The Unity Monument was erected in 1923 to symbolize the reunification of the United States. The single top crosspiece joining the two pillars represents the reunification of the North and South.



96 comments:

  1. Love the photos and the history! We just returned from Cades Cove in Gatlinburg, TN and enjoyed seeing a few of these pioneer homes! Have a great one!

    ReplyDelete
  2. That looks like a great museum to visit. I like your pictures and the south behind. Very informative. Thanks again for another great link-up :-)
    Maya of Pretty Nails and Tea - 320 Steps | St Peters Basilica Rome

    ReplyDelete
  3. I love visiting historic sites and I am part of a historic re-enactment group. I often feel like I'm time tripping and it is such a neat way to learn and understand our shared history. Thank you for sharing this and bring us here virtually. I really enjoyed this post.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks for the lesson of history together with your great photos.
    That all is new for me...
    Greetings from Germany

    ReplyDelete
  5. So very interesting pictures! Thanks for sharing history!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Thank you for sharing this interesting information and the pictures are informative of the times.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Seeing past interiors are always interesting - it does not matter who they belong to:)

    ReplyDelete
  8. Interesting story (it also cracks me up when the original is destroyed and they put something to replace it, then say it's the thing...hee hee)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hi! I feel weight of the history. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I almost thought there'd be a Confederate flag...I am glad we have more comfortable homes than these!

    ReplyDelete
  11. What an amazing place and look back to Civil War history, Sue! It was such a sad and devatating war for our country to have endured.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I love reading about history! Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  13. I appreciate you sharing the history of this place. My brother literally lives minutes away from this place and I've never taken the time to actually learn what made it historic other than the Civil War part. Thanks again.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thank you for sharing the history of United States!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I was looking back into Germany history recent weekend when I visited Rothenburg o.T. in Southern Germany - a place where you find tourists from all over the world. Rothenburg looks quite a bit different from the place you visited - but more or less we both travel back in history - to see where we come from.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Really cool .. it feels like going back in time looking at your pictures above.

    ReplyDelete
  17. What a place, I really love everything old (execept getting old ;))

    ReplyDelete
  18. I love visiting historical places because of the stories they tell. What an interesting place to visit.

    ReplyDelete
  19. An interesting slice of history. Great photos too.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Great post! Thanks for sharing your awesome photos, along with some amazing history content!

    ReplyDelete
  21. What great photos of a time in the past, fascinating!!!
    Thanks for hosting and stopping by Oh My Heartsie Girl!
    Have a great week!
    Karren

    ReplyDelete
  22. It is always so interesting to visit those landmarks and think about what it was like back then.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Love how well preserved this area is and its value in history!

    ReplyDelete
  24. I always love learning a bit more history and I don't know that much American history, so thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Wow. What a great piece of history. Love it. Thank you very much for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  26. That is some piece of history there

    ReplyDelete
  27. Great history lesson and images as well. There are a couple of Civil War battlefields near our home, but they do not have the historical significance of the Bennett House. Still, men on both sides fought and died on those hallowed grounds, to protect their homes and lifestyles.

    ReplyDelete
  28. I love American history, in fact I have a degree in history. That looks like a wonderful place to visit. Thanks for linking up at the Talbert Zoo. Have a terrific week!

    ReplyDelete
  29. My favorite photos are the two with the tables and chairs in front of the fireplaces. Places to sit and converse in bygone days.

    ReplyDelete
  30. Hi Y'all!

    Know Bennett Place. Those are great photos.

    Y'all come on by,
    Hawk aka BrownDog

    ReplyDelete
  31. Way cool!

    http://joycelansky.blogspot.com/2015/08/ww-election.html

    ReplyDelete
  32. So excited to be a part of this blog hop again! I really enjoyed reading your post :) Have a wonderful week

    ReplyDelete
  33. Great photos, Sue! That museum looks fascinating -- I love learning about history.

    Thank you for hosting. :)

    ReplyDelete
  34. I've been there! Both generals were concerned because they had just heard of Lincoln's assassination so they wanted to make peace promptly. You photographed the site beautifully.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Great history lesson! I read more about it and can't believe I didn't know it was there when I lived in Raleigh. I'll go visit when I pass through the area!

    ReplyDelete
  36. How very cool! I need to add this to our travel list.
    :-)
    Traci

    ReplyDelete
  37. Fascinating post, that's so interesting how they restored and set up the house so this memory would be there. Important to preserve this

    ReplyDelete
  38. Always loved places like this...reminds me of our "Home in the Hollow"...:)JP

    ReplyDelete
  39. I love visiting historic places like this, so thanks for the marvelous virtual tour. Blessings!

    ReplyDelete
  40. Love to visit Civil War sites -- and this looks like one to add to our list.

    ReplyDelete
  41. Wow...!!! I'm fascinated!

    By, Nikonina

    ReplyDelete
  42. Love this series of shots, especially the rustic look in all of these. The history of the place is very interesting too, I love it. You always post the most interesting photos. - Tasha

    ReplyDelete
  43. Beautiful photos and interesting history

    ReplyDelete
  44. These are things we should never forget. I would love to visit this part of our National History. Maybe this California girl will be able to one day see these things.

    ReplyDelete
  45. My favorite travels are those that take me back in time. Great post as it did just that and has such lovely photos.

    ReplyDelete
  46. Thanks for a great post & love the photos. Wishing you a happy Wordless Wednesday :)

    ReplyDelete
  47. Fabulous photos and the history. Thank you for sharing with OMHG Wordless Wednesday Link Party. Co-host Evija, From Evija with Love xx

    ReplyDelete
  48. Very interesting piece of history! I never knew about this I will have to put it on my to-do list if I ever come down to Virgina.

    ReplyDelete
  49. Awesome photos! I love visiting sites like this!

    ReplyDelete
  50. aha! the snaps were lovely :)
    Always a treasure to go back in history and admire man's past!

    Thanks for linking up and pleasure to link back with ya!
    xoxo

    ReplyDelete
  51. I am sucker for this kind of places (since I love history). Glad you enjoy these places too.

    ReplyDelete
  52. Superb! Such a nice post. Keep sharing.....

    ReplyDelete
  53. Just came back across to say thank you for the lovely comments! - Tasha

    ReplyDelete
  54. An enlightening post and really wonderful pictures!! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  55. Charming house. A little central air (this is GA, after all!) and indoor plumbing and I'd be ready to move in. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  56. Great, thanks for sharing!
    All the best!

    ReplyDelete
  57. My husband, who is a Civil War Buff, would LOVE to visit this area. Great photos.
    Thanks for the invite, but I don't do too much meme-ing these days since my heart attack. I appreciate your kind gesture tho.

    ReplyDelete
  58. A great collection of photos. Love the ceiling board and batten!
    ~Lisa

    ReplyDelete
  59. Great pics and history. Thanks for sharing and also for stopping by and your kind comment. Wishing you a nice weekend.
    Hugs, cm

    ReplyDelete
  60. neat old place full of history. like that old fence.

    ReplyDelete
  61. A slice of history beautifully captured!

    ReplyDelete
  62. That's a great way to provide authenticity in a reproduction.
    ~

    ReplyDelete
  63. This was such a delight for me! I adore history and the house and grounds photos were amazing! Too bad the original Bennett home was destroyed but I love the house that is there with it's warm woods and rustic features. Loved reading about this pivotal moment in American history! Great photos!

    ReplyDelete
  64. Hello Sue, thanks for sharing this bit of history and site. I am happy that we have these places to visit, they reminds of us of our past. Wonderful photos and post. Happy Friday, enjoy your weekend!

    ReplyDelete
  65. i so enjoy outings that include a stop at a beautiful, historic spot like this. beautiful images and a great, rustic looking fence!!!

    ReplyDelete
  66. Thank you for all the lovely comments on my recent post! - Tasha

    ReplyDelete
  67. Beautiful images, brilliant camera work Sue.

    ReplyDelete
  68. Interesting history and beautiful pictures of building.

    ReplyDelete
  69. Enjoyed your Civil War post! It looks like an interesting place to visit. I take it Wordless Wednesday is for photos-only (no word) posts? Thanks for dropping by my blog!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Great photos, Sue! Thank you for sharing them with us for Photo Friday!

    ReplyDelete
  71. Hi there, I thought I would stop back by and invite you to party at my place, n the weekend.

    Friday Feature-Linky-Party this week, hope you would like to stop by and add other links.
    Have a great weekend, Karren

    ReplyDelete
  72. Just great post! Love all the pictures and the history too!

    Thanks Sue for your visit and nice comment!
    Have a lovely weekend.

    ReplyDelete
  73. Hi Sue, interesting bit of history and photos! Thanks for sharing! - Karen

    ReplyDelete
  74. As a child I often wondered why they didn't build whole houses the way they built chimneys, because every time a house burned down, the chimney was still there.

    ReplyDelete
  75. Great to read a bit of history surrounding Benett House. Absolutely love the clicks:)

    ReplyDelete
  76. Thank you for sharing that history, it's so very interesting. Loved the photographs too!
    Happy Sunday, Sue!
    Nancy

    ReplyDelete
  77. I now so little about American history. I really need to learn some more particularly as I have an American sister-in-law!

    ReplyDelete
  78. great photos..I especially like the one looking into the room with the spinning(?) wheel..

    ReplyDelete
  79. I like visiting historic places like these, it is always so interesting to learn about the past.

    ReplyDelete
  80. That looks like a great piece of history!

    ReplyDelete
  81. Very interesting post. I like to read about historcial events.

    ReplyDelete
  82. Hello! I believe this is my first time here at this blog. Thanks for commenting on my macro monday post. I am loving this weekly link up; but, most of the critters i take pictures of are not so strange -- butterflies and spiders. Does that still qualify to link up?

    ReplyDelete
  83. These are nice photo's. I need to the place you visited on my bucket list.

    I love to visit historical places.

    Thanks for sharing

    John

    ReplyDelete
  84. This is a cool way to learn some history!

    ReplyDelete
  85. i love visiting historical places like this! thank you for linking and have a great weekend :)

    ReplyDelete
  86. The major clients of such service providers are advertising and marketing agencies,Image
    photography studios, graphic design studios, web designers and in some cases
    printing companies and lithographers too.

    ReplyDelete
  87. Very informative and useful article, i like to read your article very much. Thanks a lot for sharing with us.

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for your visit. I read every comment and value both your visit and your thoughts. Please stop by every Tuesday and share your favorite photos!